Introducing my Leica IIIc from 1949

For years and years I have been driven to freeze moments and fractions of moments. An artist aims not always at creating, but at times to conserve. In 1985 I prepared for my very first trip on my own and for the first time into an unknown destination. Nothing seemed more self-evident to me than the need for a camera able to freeze fractions  with quality and accuracy. I did not need to document where I had been. I needed to produce pictures that would express an importance of the moment that becomes important due it being dissected into a frozen state. For this I began with a Nikon FM2, not knowing a thing about ‘photography’, only knowing that it would provide me with a fairly reliable instrument to work with.

Nineteen-eighty-five, all the way up to two-thousand-fourteen, and I feel that I am just now noticing the details behind my needing to photograph, while not wanting to call myself a photographer. During the most part of three decades I was living an impulse that I suspect was set in me by constantly having seen my father while I was growing up, either with a Super-8 or with a Minolta, or an Olympus. He was frequently capturing what his family did in pictures.

Now I own a Leica IIIc that was built in 1949 and just received the lens for it which was built in 1948.

I love aesthetics – those produced by others and those I intend to compose (or recompose) by freezing moments into small frames.

Face to face, photographed by a Leica D-Lux 4 with 65 years of age
65 years of age. Face to face photographed by a Leica D-Lux 4.

For years and years I have been driven to freeze moments and fractions of moments. An artist aims not always at creating, but at times to conserve. In 1985 I prepared for my very first trip on my own and for the first time into an unknown destination. Nothing seemed more self-evident to me than the need for a camera able to freeze fractions  with quality and accuracy. I did not need to document where I had been. I needed to produce pictures that would express an importance of the moment that becomes important due it being dissected into a frozen state. For this I began with a Nikon FE2, not knowing a thing about ‘photography’, only knowing that it would provide me with a fairly reliable instrument to work with. Nineteen-eighty-five, all the way up to two-thousand-fourteen, and I feel that I am just now noticing the details behind my needing to photograph. During the most part of three decades I was living an impulse that I suspect was set in me by constantly having seen my father, either with a Super-8 or with a Minolta, as I was growing and he was frequently capturing what his family did.

 

Face to face, photographed by a Leica D-Lux 4 with 65 years of age

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